Warm temperatures result in early season bloom

News

Temperatures have been well above average and and that means blooms along the Fresno County Blossom Trail are well ahead of schedule.

All along Fresno county you can start to see blossoms at orchards; and in another week or so many of these trees will be in full bloom.

It may be hard to imagine but with a little help from these bees and a lot of our California sunshine, these blossoms wont look like flowers for long.

“Fresno County in itself feeds the world, and those blossoms turn into fruit,” said Tammy Wolfe with the Sanger District Chamber of Commerce. 

Apricots, oranges, and peaches are just a few of the valley’s signature crops that start out in this beautiful and delicate way.

“We have people from all over the world coming to see these blossoms.”

But after an unseasonably warm start to February the timing of this bloom is multiple week’s ahead of schedule. On the surface this may not seem like a problem, but Stacie Grote with Simonian Farms says some growers are concerned.

“If we were to get a frost in the next few weeks it could devastate the cherry crop,” stated Grote.

Cold temperatures can be important during the winter so plants can go dormant, but expose an orchard in full bloom to the cold and it be be an entirely different story.

“If we get a frost and it drops below 30 degrees, 32 degrees, then it will cause the pistol to shrivel up and there will be no fruit set because the pistol is actually where the fruit is coming from,” she mentioned. 

The issue here, the process is well ahead of schedule and if mother nature decides to turn back the clock…

 “We still have so much time to go where the weather could change, storms, frost. It’s not unheard of to have a frost in March, so that’s making all the farmers a little nervous,” said Grote. 

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