FDA extends pregnancy warning for common pain relievers

Health

FILE – This Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017 photo shows tablets of ibuprofen in New York. On Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration said that pregnant women should avoid a group of common pain relievers including Advil and Aleve for the last four months of pregnancy, expanding the warning from three months. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pregnant women should avoid a group of common pain relievers including Advil and Aleve for the last four months of pregnancy, federal health officials said Thursday, expanding the warning from three months.

The Food and Drug Administration said the fever-and-pain-reducing drugs can cause a rare but serious complication that can harm the fetus. They can lead to kidney problems in the fetus that can result in low levels of amniotic fluid that fills the womb.

The warning applies to a family of anti-inflammatory drugs that includes both over-the-counter ingredients like ibuprofen and prescription-strength drugs like Celebrex. The drugs are among the most widely taken medications in the U.S. and include hundreds of generic cold, flu and sleep aids that often combine multiple pharmaceutical ingredients.

FDA labeling already warns that they should be avoided in the last three months of pregnancy due to the risk of other complications.

In one exception, the FDA said the new warning does not apply to low-dose aspirin when recommended by a doctor.

Federal regulators said they decided to extended the warning after finding 35 cases of the amniotic fluid problem reported to the FDA and reviewing similar examples in published research. Use of the pain relievers reduced amniotic fluid in as little as two days, in some cases, the FDA said. Generally, the problem reversed itself three to six days after women stopped taking the medications.

Women who aren’t sure if their medication contains the drugs should talk to a doctor or a pharmacist, the agency said.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

CBS47 On Your Side

Do you have a problem that you need help solving? Contact CBS47 and let us be On Your Side.

Phone: 559-761-0383
Email: OnYourSide@cbsfresno.com

Images from Armenia

Small patients in Armenia
Yerevan by night.
Dr. Jeff Thomas delivers.
Dr. Jeff Thomas delivers in Gyumri.
Doctors unpack medical supplies from The Central Valley.
Fresno Medical Mission at work.
Medical Supplies being unloaded.
Fresno Medical Mission at the ready.
KSEE24 crew witnesses the miracle of life in Gyumri, Armenia.
Life saving work of Central Valley surgeons in Armenia.
Ribbon cutting on new surgical center in Ashtarak Armenia. Fresno donors made this dream come true.
KSEE24 on assignment with the Fresno Medical Mission
Honorary Consulate to Armenia Berj Apkarian explains the crisis facing one hospital.
KSEE24's Stefani Booroojian and Kevin Mahan at the meeting with President Bako Sahakyan.
Medical Meeting in Artsakh.
The President of Artsakh meets with the Fresno Medical Mission.
Learning modern medicine techniques with the Fresno Medical Mission in surgery.
Leaning in for a look. Dr. Brien Tonkinson holds class and helps a patient in Armenia.
Fresno Medical Mission cares on one of the smallest patients in the region. Six-year old Yanna receives life-changing better breathing surgery.