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What’s on the ballot in Fresno County for the March 3 primary

Your Local Election

FRESNO COUNTY, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) – With the March 2020 election just weeks away, we created a guide with the major races and measures in Fresno County you can expect to see on your ballots.

Cities in Fresno County: Clovis, Coalinga, Firebaugh, Fowler, Fresno, Huron, Kerman, Kingsburg, Mendota, Orange Cove, Parlier, Reedley, San Joaquin, Sanger, Selma

Fresno County Clerk Brandi Orth said the only city that has a mayor race in the March 2020 ballot is the city of Fresno. A lot of the other cities will be on the November 2020 ballot. 

FRESNO MAYORAL RACE

Here are the candidates who are running:

  1. Brian E. Jefferson 
  2. Andrew Janz
  3. Nikolas Wildstar
  4. Floyd D. Harris Jr.
  5. Johnny W. Nelum
  6. Bill Gates
  7. Jerry Dyer
  8. Richard B. Renteria

Although there are eight candidates hoping to be Fresno’s next mayor, eyes have been on two: Andrew Janz & Jerry Dyer. 

Andrew Janz is a Fresno prosecutor who has expressed the importance of prioritizing homelessness. He also ran for Congress against Rep. Devin Nunes in 2018 and lost by 12 percentage points. 

Jerry Dyer is the former Fresno Police Department Chief and has also expressed making homelessness a priority. 

Here is what they had to say about their plans to work toward solving homelessness in Fresno:

Dyer says he wants to build navigation centers, tent-like shelters that would provide temporary housing for the homeless while providing a number of different services. He wants to do it along G St. 

“A navigation center to me is a location, a centralized location that you bring people to, where you can provide them with services for mental health, a drug addiction, alcohol addiction, and you stabilize that individual,” Dyer said. “In this case, a navigation center would be sprung up structures like they have in San Diego, where you can house up to 100 people in each of those centers and it’s a temporary place to stay for say 90 days.”

San Francisco has six different navigation centers and San Diego has bridge shelters, which are shelters with a similar concept to navigation centers. 

Dyer said the purpose is to centralize services in one place for these individuals and then help them transition into more permanent housing. 

Dyer has faced backlash from several city councilmembers who say they don’t want these navigation centers in their districts.

FRESNO CITY COUNCIL:

  1. District 2: Mike Karbassi (Incumbent & running unopposed)
  2. District 4: Nathan Alonzo vs. Tyler Maxwell (No incumbent)
  3. District 6: Garry Bredefeld (Incumbent & running unopposed)

FRESNO COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

  1. District 2 Steve Brandau (Incumbent & running unopposed)
  2. District 3: Sal Quintero (Incumbent & running unopposed)
  3. District 5: Nathan Magsig (Incumbent & running unopposed)

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGE NO. 11

  1. Douglas Treisman
  2. Elizabeth A. Egan

FRESNO COUNTY MEASURES

1. City of Reedley – Proposed Transactions & Use Tax (Needs a 50% + 1 to pass)

This measure would increase the transactions and sales tax by 0.75% in the city of Reedley. It would increase the sales tax by ¾ of a penny for each dollar spent, meaning $0.75 would be added to an item that’s priced at $100. 

With this measure, the sales tax rate in Reedley would increase from 8.475% to 9.225%. The proposed tax increase does not contain an end date. 

The city of Reedley estimates this sales tax increase could generate up to $1.5 million each year to be used for services and programs, including 911 emergency first responders, fire prevention, neighborhood patrols, anti-gang and drug programs, homelessness outreach and more.

If the measure is approved, the increase would begin on July 1.

Those in favor say the money is needed to ensure there are enough police officers that can respond to 911 calls and replace public safety equipment.

The measure needs 50% + 1 of the votes to pass.

2. Cutler Orosi Joint Unified School District – Special Parcel Tax 

If this measure is approved, the Cutler Orosi Joint Unified School District will be authorized to tax property owners within the district’s boundaries in the amount of $38 annually per parcel. 

This is to raise money for the district’s sports complexes and create youth recreation programs. 

Those in favor say the parcel tax would hire staff to maintain sports complexes, purchase equipment, pay utilities and pay for transportation.

This measure needs 66.66% of voter approval to pass.

3. Clovis Unified School District General Obligation Bond

If this measure is approved, the Clovis Unified School District governing board can issue and sell bonds up to $408 million.

The proceeds could be used to construct or reconstruct school facilities and update classrooms. The district can only use the money for the specified purposes, but the measure does not guarantee that every project on the list will be funded or completed. A citizens’ oversight committee will be established to make sure the money is being spent like stated in the measure. 

Those in favor say the measure would repair and upgrade a number of school facilities and programs and that every dollar will stay in the community. 

The measure needs a 55% of votes in favor to pass.

4. Central Unified District General Obligation Bond (55% to pass)

If this measure is passed, the Central Unified District governing board can issue and sell bonds up to $120 million. 

The proceeds can be used to construct and rehabilitate school facilities. The district can only use the money for the reasons listed in the measure, but the measure does not guarantee that every project on the list will be funded or completed. 

Those in favor say the measure will allow the district to complete the construction of a new high school, replace portable classrooms with permanent buildings, construct a new elementary school and upgrade facilities. 

The measure needs a 55% of votes in favor to pass.

5. Merced Community College District – Bond Measure (Measure J)

If this measure is passed, the Merced Community College District can issue and sell bonds up to $247 million to upgrade classrooms and facilities and improve safety.

Those in favor say this measure would prepare students and veterans to transfer to universities by upgrading facilities and technology and expanding facilities for veterans, agriculture and performing arts. 

Those against the measure say Merced County residents live with high unemployment and low incomes and can’t afford to pay for a public debt. They also say the college hasn’t shown a rising student demand for these facilities. 

This measure needs 55% of votes in favor to pass.

6. Washington Unified School District General Obligation Bond

If this measure is approved, the Washington Unified School District can issue and sell bonds up to $46 million. 

The proceeds can be used to construct, rehabilitate and replace school facilities. The district can only use the money for the reasons listed in the measure, but the measure does not guarantee that every project on the list will be funded or completed. 

Those in favor say this measure would increase the quality of the schools which would improve student achievement, increase property values, prepare students for their futures and improve neighborhood safety.

This measure needs 55% of votes in favor to pass. 

7. Parlier Unified School District General Obligation Bond 

If this measure is passed, the Parlier Unified School District governing board can issue and sell bonds up to $11 million. 

The proceeds can be used to modernize and renovate school facilities and construct new ones. 

The district can only use the money for the reasons listed in the measure, but the measure does not guarantee that every project on the list will be funded or completed. 

Those in favor of the measure say many school classrooms and facilities within the district are outdated and in need of renovation. 

The measure needs 55% of votes in favor to pass.

8. Kingsburg Joint Union High School District General Obligation Bond

If this measure passes, it authorizes the Kingsburg Joint Union High School District governing board to issue and sell bonds up to $17 million.

The proceeds can be used to construct or rehabilitate school facilities. 

The district can only use the money for the reasons listed in the measure, but the measure does not guarantee that every project on the list will be funded or completed. 

Those in favor say this measure will help create safe and quality schools. 

The measure needs 55% of votes in favor to pass. 

9. City of Orange Cove Parcel Tax (Measure G)

This measure authorizes a parcel tax on property owners that would be paid in addition to current state and local property taxes and would be collected at the same time. 

A $25 tax would be imposed on each single-family residence, a $36 tax would be imposed on each single-family residence, a $36 tax would be imposed on each agricultural property, a $180 tax would be imposed on each commercial property and a $275 tax would be imposed on each industrial property in the city. 

Measure G states that the tax money would be used to “improve public safety and emergency response times; maintain the number of on-duty police officers; fight crime/gangs/drugs; provide modern firefighting equipment, with all money used only for local Police and Fire.”

If it’s approved, the tax is set to expire in four years.

The measure needs 66.66% of votes in favor to pass.

10. City of Selma to Operate a Card Room Ordinance (Measure L)

Measure L allows the city of Selma to issue a single license to operate one cardroom or gambling room where games, such as draw poker, low-ball poker, paguine, seven card stud and other legal games can be played. 

California already has enacted a temporary moratorium of the establishment of cardrooms, but this measure ensures that in the event that it expires or is repealed, the city would continue to allow cardrooms in Selma.

The cardroom would be subject to a licensing fee, which could generate revenue for the city of Selma. 

The measure needs 50% + 1 of votes in favor to pass.

11. Fresno Unified School District General Obligation Bond (Measure M)

The measure authorizes the Fresno Unified School District governing bond to issue and sell bonds up to $325 million.

The measure states that the proceeds would be used to:

  • Provide quality schools
  • Increase safety/security
  • Attract /retain teachers 
  • Improve career education, technology, science classrooms
  • Remove lead/asbestos
  • Upgrade heating/air conditioning 

The district can only use the bond money for the listed reasons, but the measure does not guarantee that every project on the list will be funded or completed. 

Those in favor say Measure M will provide locally controlled funding for schools to prepare students for college and jobs. 

Measure M needs 55% of votes in favor to pass.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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