Students Study Moon Rocks

Students Study Moon Rocks

It's the 45th anniversary of the first moon walk and some Central Valley students got a chance to study moon rocks up-close.
It's the 45th anniversary of the first moon walk and some Central Valley students got a chance to study moon rocks up-close.

The rocks collected on various Apollo missions come from different parts of the moon.

Reedly College Upward Bound science teacher Steve Harness says, "When NASA got their samples in they designated a certain amount of samples for educational purposes.  They sealed them up in Lucite so they oxygen in the air and the water wouldn't damage them and made them available to schools."

He has special certification to borrow the rocks from NASA and use them in the classroom.  The moon rocks travel in special protective locking suitcases.  Harness says, "I keep them locked up.  They're locked up here in a very safe place, here.  And at school they're locked up in a very safe place there."

Upward Bound students must keep good grades to stay in the program.  Dinuba High School student Evelyn Valencuela says holding the moon rocks made her excited and nervous.  She says, "It makes me imagine how it would be being on the moon."  She's planning a career in medicine.

Upward Bound is a program designed to broaden horizons of local low-income or first generation college-bound students.  Reedley College hosts one of the largest programs in the nation.

Harness says, "Any exposure to every different area of science can help to tweak their imagination as to what they could do when they choose a career."
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