RDA/Food pyramid

RDA/Food pyramid

In 1990, Congress passed the 'Nutrition Labeling and Education Act' to clear up confusion over food labels.

In 1990, Congress passed the 'Nutrition Labeling and Education Act' to clear up confusion over food labels. The 'Recommended Daily Allowances,' or 'R-D-A's' are the most commonly used guidelines for determining how much of each vitamin and mineral people need to maintain health. The term 'Percent Daily Value,' or 'Percent D-V, as it appears on labels, replaced the term'R-D-A,' or 'Recommended Daily Allowances,' which had replaced the term 'Minimum Daily Requirements,' or 'M-D-R's.' The Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council, part of the National Academy of Sciences, establishes the amounts. All nutrients on the label are expressed as a percentage of the daily value that one serving contributes to a 2,000-calorie diet. These recommended amounts are adjusted periodically, depending on medical research. The N-A-S currently is updating its information concerning how it sets reference values for all nutrients. The new title will be 'Dietary Reference Intakes,' or 'D-R-I's.' The U-S Department of Agriculture developed the 'food pyramid' in 1992, an update of post-World War II's 'Basic Four Food Groups.' The base of the pyramid includes the food group that people need the most from: bread, cereal, rice, and pasta. On the next level are two categories: vegetables and fruit. The next level up also contains two categories. First is the 'milk, yogurt, and cheese group;' the other is the 'meat, poultry, fish, dried beans, eggs, and nuts' group. At the top of the pyramid, which the U-S-D-A says should be used 'sparingly,' are 'fats, oils, and sweets.

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