Power shift in State Senate

Power shift in State Senate

Democrats lose supermajority
Accusations of dirty politics.
Not one, not two, but three State Senators facing charges for accepting bribes for political
favors.
"This has to stop at the state level and it's got to stop now," said
Republican Assemblymember for District 23 Jim Patterson.
The charges could signal a change in the direction of an otherwise left wing Senate,
giving Republicans more power.
"I thought when I read the newspaper about Senator Lee and his difficulties I was
reading the script for the next 'House of Cards.' It's that serious and it's
that bad," said Patterson.
Democrats no longer have their two thirds vote, making compromise with
Republicans unavoidable.
It could mean Republicans may now be able to pass their short term solutions on the
water crisis.
Political analyst Don Larson says the voters' trust is
broken.
"People are not happy with what's going on the part of either party and
that's why you see the number of people declined to state. People registering to
vote they just aren't interested in belonging to either party," said
Larson.
With June elections only weeks away, voters could hand down a punishment of their
own, as the men entrusted to represent them are accused of being paid
off.
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